6 Rhode Islanders have been jailed as part of a joint state and federal crackdown on Medicaid scams, Attorney General Peter F. Kilmartin revealed Thursday.

The following were detained Wednesday early morning:

— Giovanne Gomez, 29, of Providence. Gomez is charged with 2 counts of medical help scams and 5 counts of conspiracy;

— Tomas Espinal, 40, of Providence. Espinal is charged with 2 counts of medical help scams, one count of laundering financial instruments and one count of conspiracy.

— Margarita Martinez, 55, of Providence. Martinez is charged with one count of medical support scams and one count of conspiracy.

— Mariser Liranzo, 37, of Providence. Liranzo is charged with 2 counts of medical help scams and one count of conspiracy.

The following turned themselves into cops Thursday early morning:

— Martine Silva, 41, of Providence. Silva is charged with 2 counts of medical support scams and 2 counts of conspiracy.

— Anair Centeio, 40, of North Providence. Centeio is charged with 2 counts of medical help scams and one count of conspiracy.

Gomez and Silva were both staff members at A Caring Experience, a state Medicaid service provider. In between February 2016 and March 2017, Gomez and Silva apparently conspired with the other offenders, who were all family members and good friends, to take the determines of previous staff members and send falsified time sheets on their behalf. Fraudent pay of around $130,000 was then diverted to savings account connected to the accused.

A Caring Experience reported issues to the attorney general of the United States’ Medicaid Fraud Unit.

Nationally, more than 400 people were charged in different health care scams and opioid rip-offs that amounted to $1.3 billion in incorrect billing, Attorney General Jeff Sessions revealed Thursday.

Sessions called it the “biggest health care scams takedown operation in American history.”.

Individuals charged were unlawfully billing Medicare, Medicaid and the medical insurance program that serves members of the militaries, retired service members, and their households, the Justice Department stated. The accusations consist of claims that individuals who were charged billed the programs for unneeded drugs that were never ever bought or offered to the clients.